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Measles Advisory: Stay Alert for Measles Cases

The following content is from the CT DPH and CDC COCA Now on February 1, 2024 and was not written by HVHD. There has been a recent increase in measles activity internationally and in the United States. Healthcare providers should be on alert for patients who have: (1) febrile rash illness and symptoms consistent with measles (e.g.,

Measles Advisory: Stay Alert for Measles Cases Read More »

The following content is from the CT DPH and CDC COCA Now on February 1, 2024 and was not written by HVHD.

There has been a recent increase in measles activity internationally and in the United States. Healthcare providers should be on alert for patients who have: (1) febrile rash illness and symptoms consistent with measles (e.g., cough, coryza, or conjunctivitis), and (2) have recently traveled abroad, especially to countries with ongoing measles outbreaks. Infected people are contagious from 4 days before the rash starts through 4 days afterwards. The average incubation period of measles (from contact with a case until onset of rash) is 14 days, with a range of 7–21 days.

Measles cases often originate from unvaccinated or under vaccinated U.S. residents who travel internationally and then transmit the disease to people who are not vaccinated against measles. The increased number of measles importations seen in recent weeks is reflective of a rise in global measles cases and a growing global threat from the disease.

Recommendations for Healthcare Providers 

  1. Consider measles in patients who present with a febrile rash illness. Have a high index of suspicion in patients who present with a morbilliform rash with fever still present at the time of rash onset AND cough, coryza, or conjunctivitis.

The characteristic measles rash is classically described as a generalized, maculopapular, erythematous rash that begins several days after the fever starts. It starts on the head and neck before spreading to cover most of the body, often causing itching. The measles rash appears two to four days after the initial symptoms (fever/cough) and lasts for up to eight days. The rash is said to “stain”, changing color from red to dark brown, before disappearing. Koplik’s spots seen inside the mouth are pathognomonic (diagnostic) but are not often seen because they are transient and may disappear within a day of arising.

  1. Isolate: Do not allow patients with suspected measles to remain in the waiting room or other common areas of the healthcare facility; isolate patients with suspected measles immediately, ideally in a single-patient airborne infection isolation room (AIIR) if available, or in a private room with a closed door until an AIIR is available. Healthcare providers should be adequately protected against measles and should adhere to standard and airborne precautions when evaluating suspect cases regardless of their vaccination status

If a patient needs to be sent to hospital for evaluation, give them a mask to wear and telephone ahead and let the Emergency Department or Ambulance staff (if applicable) know that you are referring a case of suspected measles.

  1. Notify: Immediately notify the Connecticut Department of Public Health (CT DPH) Immunization Program about any suspected case of measles to ensure rapid testing and investigation. Measles is a category 1 reportable disease in Connecticut, which means providers must call immediately upon suspicion.

Call 860-509-7929 during normal business hours (M-F 8:30am to 4:30 pm). To report a suspected case after hours or on weekends/holidays, call 860-509-8000.

  1. Test:  Follow CDC’s testing recommendations and collect either a nasopharyngeal swab or throat swab for reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), as well as a blood specimen for serology from all patients with clinical features compatible with measles. RT-PCR is the gold standard test for measles diagnosis and is available at the CT DPH Laboratory (DPHL) for the fastest turnaround time. Testing performed at DPHL must be coordinated through the CT DPH Immunization Program.
  1. Manage: In coordination with CT DPH staff, provide appropriate measles post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) to close contacts without evidence of immunity, either measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) or immunoglobulin. The choice of PEP is based on elapsed time from exposure or medical contraindications to vaccination.  

Seek advice from CT DPH regarding the management of susceptible contacts:

  1. If you suspect a patient has measles, DPH will discuss recommendations regarding public health measures after evaluating available clinical and risk-factor information.
  2. If you have questions about managing an asymptomatic patient who reports a measles exposure, please contact the Immunization Program.
  1. Vaccinate: Make sure all your patients are up to date on measles vaccine, especially before international travel. People 6 months of age or older who will be traveling internationally should be protected against measles. 

Check vaccination records for:

  1. Your staff – All staff born during or since 1957 should have documentation of two doses of measles containing vaccine.
  2. Your patients – Ideally all patients born during or since 1966 should have received two doses of a measles-containing vaccine. Currently MMR vaccine is routinely recommended at 12–15 months and 4–6 years of age.

For More Information: 

CT DPH announces voluntary recall for BrightFarms spinach brand

The following content is from the CT DPH on January 19, 2024 and was not written by HVHD. HARTFORD, Conn— The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has notified the Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) that Bright Farms has issued a voluntary recall of spinach grown by its supplier Element Farms in their Pompton Plains, NJ farm and distributed

CT DPH announces voluntary recall for BrightFarms spinach brand Read More »

The following content is from the CT DPH on January 19, 2024 and was not written by HVHD.

HARTFORD, Conn— The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has notified the Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) that Bright Farms has issued a voluntary recall of spinach grown by its supplier Element Farms in their Pompton Plains, NJ farm and distributed under the Bright Farms brand.

The spinach has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Bright Farms is also issuing a voluntary recall of a limited quantity of four salad kit products from its Selinsgrove, PA facility. The company has temporarily suspended distribution of Element Farms grown spinach.

The recalled products have been distributed to several states, including Connecticut. A distribution list has not been released at this time. Retailers have been instructed to remove all recalled products from store shelves.

The products come in various sized plastic containers. Further details, including pictures of the various recalled packages and products, can be found here: Brightfarms Recalls Spinach and Salad Kits Because of Possible Health Risk as a Result of Supplier Element Farms Recall | FDA

“Consumers are advised not to eat the recalled products. Listeria monocytogenes is an organism that can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems,” said DPH Commissioner Manisha Juthani, MD. “Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriage and stillbirths among pregnant women. People who develop symptoms of listeriosis after eating the recalled products should seek medical care and tell their provider about eating that product.”

Food Safety Warning/Recall Notice: Florentine cookies sold at Stew Leonard’s contain undeclared peanuts

The following content is from the CT DPH on January 23, 2024 and was not written by HVHD. HARTFORD, Conn.— The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection Food, Standards and Product Safety Division and the Connecticut Department of Public Health are warning the public about cookies sold at Stew Leonard’s grocery stores in Danbury and Newington that contained

Food Safety Warning/Recall Notice: Florentine cookies sold at Stew Leonard’s contain undeclared peanuts Read More »

The following content is from the CT DPH on January 23, 2024 and was not written by HVHD.

HARTFORD, Conn.— The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection Food, Standards and Product Safety Division and the Connecticut Department of Public Health are warning the public about cookies sold at Stew Leonard’s grocery stores in Danbury and Newington that contained undeclared peanuts. Stew Leonard’s has issued a recall for the products.

One death has been reported that may be associated with the mislabeled product. The death was initially reported to the Food and Drug Administration. The person, an individual in their 20s who was a resident of New York, was reported to have consumed the cookies at a social gathering in Connecticut.

Cookies affected by the recall are Florentine Cookies with a best by date of Jan. 5, 2024. These cookies are seasonal and were sold in Danbury and Newington from Nov. 6 to Dec. 31, 2023.

Consumers with a nut allergy should immediately dispose of the cookies or return them to the point of sale and seek medical attention if necessary.

The Florentine Cookies were produced by a wholesaler, Cookies United, in Islip, New York, labeled with the Stew Leonard’s brand name, and sold only at the Danbury and Newington stores.

Out of an abundance of caution, DCP worked with Stew Leonard’s to remove all baked items produced by Cookies United from all Stew Leonard’s Connecticut locations.

DCP investigators are working with state and local public health officials in Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey, the Food and Drug Administration and Stew Leonard’s to determine the cause of the error, as well as if any other products were affected and sold to other stores.

“This is a heartbreaking tragedy that should never have happened,” said DCP Commissioner Bryan T. Cafferelli. “DCP Food Investigators are working hard with the Department of Public Health, local health departments, officials in New York State and New Jersey, the Food and Drug Administration and Stew Leonard’s to determine how this error happened and prevent a similar tragedy from occurring in the future. Our condolences go out to the family affected by this incident.”

“Correct labeling so that people who have food allergies can appropriately protect themselves is of utmost importance. I am devastated to learn of this incident and will work with partners to ensure that we can protect people with food allergies. I cannot stress enough the importance of food allergy awareness so that an avoidable tragedy like this doesn’t happen again,” said DPH Commissioner Manisha Juthani, MD. “We will continue to work with all our partners — including restaurants and retailers — to provide education on the dangers of food allergens so that best practices are being following for the safety of the residents of Connecticut.”

Yaomiao Children’s Rhinestone Silver Tiaras Recalled Due to Violation of Federal Lead Content Ban; Sold Exclusively on Amazon.com by LordRoadS

The following content is from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission on January 25, 2024 and was not written by HVHD. Recalled Yaomiao Red Rhinestone Silver Tiara Name of Product: Yaomiao Children’s Rhinestone Silver Tiaras Hazard: The rhinestones embedded in the recalled tiaras contain levels of lead that exceed the federal lead content ban. Lead

Yaomiao Children’s Rhinestone Silver Tiaras Recalled Due to Violation of Federal Lead Content Ban; Sold Exclusively on Amazon.com by LordRoadS Read More »

The following content is from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission on January 25, 2024 and was not written by HVHD.

Recalled Yaomiao Red Rhinestone Silver TiaraRecalled Yaomiao Red Rhinestone Silver Tiara

Name of Product:

Yaomiao Children’s Rhinestone Silver Tiaras

Hazard:

The rhinestones embedded in the recalled tiaras contain levels of lead that exceed the federal lead content ban. Lead is toxic if ingested by young children and can cause adverse health effects.

Remedy:

Refund

Recall Date:

January 25, 2024

Units:

About 12,440

Food Safety Warning/Recall Notice: Stew Leonard’s Sliced Chicken and Chicken Salad Contained Undeclared Milk

The following content is from the CT DPH on February 5, 2024 and was not written by HVHD. Stew Leonard’s has initiated a voluntary recall for several products containing undeclared dairy, an allergen that could cause illness. HARTFORD — The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection Food, Standards and Product Safety Division (DCP) and the Connecticut Department of

Food Safety Warning/Recall Notice: Stew Leonard’s Sliced Chicken and Chicken Salad Contained Undeclared Milk Read More »

The following content is from the CT DPH on February 5, 2024 and was not written by HVHD.

Stew Leonard’s has initiated a voluntary recall for several products containing undeclared dairy, an allergen that could cause illness.

HARTFORD — The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection Food, Standards and Product Safety Division (DCP) and the Connecticut Department of Public Health are warning the public that several sliced chicken and chicken salad products sold at Stew Leonard’s grocery stores contained milk, which did not appear on the label.

Affected products were sold in the deli department from August 2022 to January 29, 2024, at all Stew Leonard’s stores in Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey. Recalled products are:

  • Sliced and Shaved Chicken
  • Sliced and Shaved Buffalo Chicken
  • Chicken Salad
  • Chicken Salad Sub Sandwich
  • Buffalo Chicken Salad
  • Boom Boom Chicken Salad
  • Cape Cod Chicken Salad (sold in Norwalk, CT only)
  • Lite Chicken Salad (sold in Norwalk, CT only)

Stew Leonard’s has issued a voluntary recall for the products. Consumers who have an allergy or severe sensitivity to milk run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume these products.  No illnesses have been reported to date.

Customers who have purchased these products should bring the product back to Stew Leonard’s customer service for a full refund.

The Connecticut Department of Public Health will provide support to DCP and will be a resource for local health departments throughout the state.

Connecticut Department of Public Health warns residents of carbon monoxide poisoning following Monday’s storm

The following content is from the CT DPH on December 18, 2023 and was not written by HVHD. HARTFORD, Conn.— As a result of Monday’s storm which delivered heavy rain and high winds, the Connecticut Department of Public Health is reminding residents about the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning from the improper use of fuel burning equipment during power

Connecticut Department of Public Health warns residents of carbon monoxide poisoning following Monday’s storm Read More »

The following content is from the CT DPH on December 18, 2023 and was not written by HVHD.

HARTFORD, Conn.— As a result of Monday’s storm which delivered heavy rain and high winds, the Connecticut Department of Public Health is reminding residents about the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning from the improper use of fuel burning equipment during power outages. Due to the current number of power outages caused by this storm, Connecticut residents are being reminded that portable generators and the indoor use of grills can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning.

“The tragic reality is that most of these carbon monoxide poisonings and deaths are completely preventable,” said DPH Commissioner Manisha Juthani, MD. “It is very important to learn how carbon monoxide gas can harm you and what you can do to keep your loved ones safe from carbon monoxide poisoning, especially if you lose power during a storm.”

Carbon monoxide is an invisible odorless gas that can be fatal. It forms when fuels like gasoline, natural gas, propane, wood, charcoal, and kerosene do not burn completely. Breathing carbon monoxide can deprive the body of oxygen, and may lead to illness, unconsciousness and death.

Symptoms of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

  • Headache, fatigue, dizziness, confusion, nausea or vomiting, and loss of consciousness. 
  • If several members of a household experience these symptoms when they are home but feel better when they are away from the home, there may be a carbon monoxide problem.  What Should I Do If I Have Symptoms?
  • Get out of the house immediately and seek medical help if you or a family member or guest has unexplained/sudden onset of symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning.  
  • Call 911 from a cell phone or neighbor’s home and the Connecticut Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222

How Do I Know?

  • Carbon monoxide alarms are the only way to know if the deadly gas is present in your home. DPH recommends that all residents with fuel burning appliances or indoor equipment install carbon monoxide alarms near all sleeping areas in their home to alert them of the presence of carbon monoxide. Install a carbon monoxide alarm on each floor of your home and outside of each bedroom. Install new batteries as per manufacturer’s instructions and replace alarms every five years, as the sensors degrade.

How can I stay safe?

  • Never use portable generators, charcoal or gas grills, gas or propane powered pressure washers, saws or other fuel powered equipment inside your home, garage, carport, basement or other enclosed spaces. Opening windows and doors and operating fans is not enough to prevent buildup of carbon monoxide in a home. 
  • Install a carbon monoxide alarm on each floor of your home & outside of each bedroom. 
  • Make sure the exhaust pipe on your standby generator is pointing away from the house. 
  • Place portable generators at least 20 feet from the house. 
  • Make sure gas dryer vents and automobile tail pipes are not plugged up with snow. 
  • Have your heating systems, chimney flues, gas appliances, wood stoves, and generators checked every year, and cleaned and serviced as needed by qualified heating/appliance contractors

For more info, contact your local health department or call the Connecticut Department of Public Health at 860-509-7740.

Additional resources:

CT DPH Environmental & Occupational Health Assessment Program:

www.ct.gov/dph/co       860-509-7740

Connecticut Poison Control Center:

http://poisoncontrol.uchc.edu       800-222-1222

Consumer Product Safety Commission

http://www.cpsc.gov (Important info about portable generators)

Severe and Fatal Confirmed Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever among People with Recent Travel to Tecate, Mexico

The following content is from the CDC Health Advisory on December 8, 2023 and was not written by HVHD. SummaryThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is issuing this Health Alert Network (HAN) Health Advisory to notify healthcare providers and the public about an outbreak of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) among people in

Severe and Fatal Confirmed Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever among People with Recent Travel to Tecate, Mexico Read More »

The following content is from the CDC Health Advisory on December 8, 2023 and was not written by HVHD.

Summary
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is issuing this Health Alert Network (HAN) Health Advisory to notify healthcare providers and the public about an outbreak of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) among people in the United States with recent travel to or residence in the city of Tecate, state of Baja California, Mexico. RMSF is a severe, rapidly progressive, and often deadly disease transmitted by the bite of infected ticks, although many patients do not recall being bitten by a tick. Doxycycline is the treatment of choice for patients of all ages. As of December 8, 2023, five patients have been diagnosed with confirmed RMSF since late July 2023; all had travel to or residence in Tecate within 2 weeks of illness onset. RMSF is endemic in multiple border states in northern Mexico, including but not exclusive to Baja California, Sonora, Chihuahua, Coahuila, and Nuevo León. Healthcare providers should consider RMSF in their differential diagnosis of patients who have reported recent travel to Tecate, Mexico, or other areas of northern Mexico and subsequently develop signs or symptoms of an unexplained severe febrile illness. Consider initiating doxycycline based on presumptive clinical and epidemiologic findings, and do not delay treatment pending the result of a confirmatory laboratory test. Early treatment with doxycycline saves lives.

Background
RMSF is endemic across northern Mexico and areas of the southwestern United States. In these regions, the pathogen (Rickettsia rickettsii) can be transmitted by brown dog ticks (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) which are closely associated with domestic dogs in urban and peri-urban environments. From July to December 2023, CDC and the California Department of Public Health identified five patients with RMSF who developed the disease within 2 weeks following travel to the city of Tecate in the state of Baja California, Mexico. All patients presented to hospitals in southern California. Four patients were under the age of 18 years. Three patients were U.S. residents, and two were residents of Mexico. All five patients were hospitalized, and three died.

RMSF is a rapidly progressive disease and without early administration of doxycycline can be fatal within days. RMSF signs and symptoms can be relatively mild and non-specific during the first 1–4 days of illness and include a low-moderate fever, headache, gastrointestinal symptoms, abdominal pain, myalgia, rash, and edema around the eyes and on the back of hands. Patients with more advanced disease, generally on or after day 5 of illness, may develop altered mental status, coma, cerebral edema, respiratory compromise, necrosis, and multiorgan system damage. The disease is rapidly progressive, and half of all people who die from this disease succumb within 8 days of illness onset. Untreated disease is often fatal, and the case fatality rate of RMSF in Mexico can exceed 40%.

Recommendations for Healthcare Providers
Diagnosis

  • Know that RMSF signs and symptoms can include fever, headache, and rash.
    • A faint macular rash usually appears on the arms and lower extremities on or about 2–4 days after onset of symptoms and becomes petechial on or about day 5 or 6 of illness. Some patients never develop a rash.
    • The disease progresses rapidly if left untreated and is frequently deadly if not treated with doxycycline within the first 5 days of illness.
    • Children younger than 10 years old are five times more likely than adults to die from RMSF. Doxycycline is the treatment of choice for patients of all ages, including young children.
    • RMSF is a multisystem disease and can also involve the lungs, heart, kidneys, and central nervous system.
  • Consider RMSF when evaluating patients presenting with RMSF signs and symptoms, including fever, headache, and rash, especially those with a travel history to Tecate or other areas in northern Mexico endemic for RMSF in the past 2 weeks.
  • The absence of a classical “spotted” rash does not exclude the diagnosis, particularly during the first few days of illness.
  • Inquire about recent travel history and exposure to ticks or tick-infested dogs when evaluating patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of RMSF.

Diagnostic Testing
If RMSF is suspected, whole blood and serum samples obtained from acutely ill people should be evaluated for Rickettsia by molecular and serologic testing methods available at commercial laboratories, state public health laboratories, or CDC.

  • Do not delay or withhold treatment pending receipt of laboratory test results or based on an initial negative test result.
  • Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification can be performed on whole blood, rash biopsy, or postmortem tissue but has low sensitivity early in the disease.
  • Serologic testing can also be performed on paired acute and convalescent serum samples collected 2–4 weeks apart. Serologic testing for detection of antibodies is frequently negative in the first week of illness.
  • Diagnostic testing at CDC may allow retrospective laboratory confirmation in patients who die from the infection.
  • If Rickettsia-specific testing is not available in a jurisdiction, specimen submission to CDC can be coordinated through your state or local health department.

Treatment

  • Doxycycline is the recommended antibiotic treatment for RMSF in adults and children of all ages, including pregnant people. Intravenous formulations are required for patients with severe nausea and vomiting and for patients who are obtunded.
  • If RMSF is suspected, initiate treatment with doxycycline immediately. Do not delay treatment pending laboratory confirmation. Early treatment saves lives.
  • In cases of severe doxycycline allergy, rapid desensitization procedures in an inpatient setting may be considered. Physicians should carefully weigh the benefits of doxycycline use and the risks of adverse effects on a case-by-case basis with an infectious disease or other specialist.

Reporting

  • RMSF is a nationally notifiable disease. Healthcare professionals and clinical laboratories should report all cases to their local, state, territorial, or tribal health department.

Recommendations for the Public

  • Seek medical attention if you or a family member has traveled to Tecate or another city in northern Mexico where RMSF has been known to occur, and develops fever, headache, or rash within 2 weeks of return to the United States.
  • Protect against tick bites by treating your dog for ticks, using EPA-registered insect repellent, and wearing protective clothing.
  • Perform thorough tick checks on yourself and children after outdoor activities or when around dogs with ticks. Promptly remove any ticks.
  • Learn about RMSF symptoms and seek medical help if you suspect that you or a family member may have this disease.

For More Information
RMSF

Travelers’ Health

References

  1. Álvarez-Hernández G., Roldán J.F.G., Milan N.S.H., Lash R.R., Behravesh C.B., Paddock C.D. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Mexico: past, present, and future. Lancet Infect Dis 2017;17(6), e189–e196. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30173-1
  2. Álvarez-Hernández G., Murillo-Benitez C., del Carmen Candia-Plata M., Moro M. Clinical profile and predictors of fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children from Sonora, Mexico. Pediatric Infect Dis J 2015;34(2), 125–130. https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0000000000000496
  3. Drexler N. A., Yaglom H., Casal M., Fierro M., Kriner P., Murphy B.,et al. Fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever along the United States-Mexico border, 2013–2016. Emerg Infect Dis 2017;23(10):1621-1626. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2310.170309
  4. Zazueta O. E., Armstrong P.A., Márquez-Elguea A., Milán N. S. H., Peterson A. E., Ovalle-Marroquín D.F., et al. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in a large metropolitan center, Mexico-United States border, 2009–2019. Emerg Infect Dis 2021;27(6):1567–1576. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2706.191662
  5. Estrada-Mendizabal R.J., Tamez-Rivera O., Vela E.H., Blanco-Murillo P., Alanis-Garza C., Flores-Gouyonnet J., et al. Rickettsial disease outbreak, Mexico, 2022. Emerg Infect Dis 2023;29(9), 1944–1947. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2909.230344
  6. Beristain-Ruiz D.M., Garza-Hernández J.A., Figueroa-Millán J.V., Lira-Amaya J.J., Quezada-Casasola A., Ordoñez-López S., et al. Possible association between selected tick-borne pathogen prevalence and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato infestation in dogs from Juarez City (Chihuahua), Northwest Mexico–US Border. Pathogens, 2022;11(5):552. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11050552
  7. López-Castillo, D. C., Vaquera-Aparicio, D., González-Soto, M. A., Martínez-Ramírez, R., Rodríguez-Muñoz, L., & Solórzano-Santos, F. Rocky mountain spotted fever: five years of active surveillance experience in a second level pediatric hospital in northeastern Mexico, 2018, [Fiebre manchada de montañas rocosas: experiencia en 5 años de vigilancia activa en un hospital pediátrico de segundo nivel en el noreste de México]. Boletin medico del Hospital Infantil de Mexico, 201875(5), 303–308. https://doi.org/10.24875/BMHIM.M18000034

PandaEar Recalls Stainless Steel Children’s Cups Due to Violation of Federal Lead Content Ban; Sold Exclusively on Amazon.com

The following content is from the US CPSC on November 22, 2023 and was not written by HVHD. Name of Product: PandaEar Stainless Steel Toddler Cups, 8 oz. Hazard: The bottom exterior of the recalled stainless-steel cups contains an accessible solder bead with levels of lead that exceed the federal lead content ban. Lead is toxic

PandaEar Recalls Stainless Steel Children’s Cups Due to Violation of Federal Lead Content Ban; Sold Exclusively on Amazon.com Read More »

The following content is from the US CPSC on November 22, 2023 and was not written by HVHD.

  • Recalled PandaEar Stainless Steel Toddler Cups, 8 oz.Recalled PandaEar Stainless Steel Toddler Cups, 8 oz.

Name of Product:

PandaEar Stainless Steel Toddler Cups, 8 oz.

Hazard:

The bottom exterior of the recalled stainless-steel cups contains an accessible solder bead with levels of lead that exceed the federal lead content ban. Lead is toxic if ingested by young children and can cause adverse health effects. In addition, the lid can crack and break during use producing sharp edges and small parts, posing choking and laceration hazards to children.

Remedy:

Refund

Recall Date:

November 22, 2023

Units:

About 1,600

Recall Details

Description:

This recall involves the 8 oz. models of PandaEar Stainless Steel Toddler Cups sold in sets of two, in pink and gray or blue and gray colors with matching silicone straws. There are no exterior markings on the cups.

Remedy:

Consumers should immediately take the recalled cups away from children, stop using them and contact PandaEar for a full refund. PandaEar and Amazon are contacting all known purchasers.

Incidents/Injuries:

None reported

Sold At:

Online at Amazon.com from May 2023 through August 2023 for about $12

Retailer:

PandaEar, of Lake Dallas, Texas

Manufactured In:

China

Recall number:

24-716

Note: Individual Commissioners may have statements related to this topic. Please visit www.cpsc.gov/commissioners to search for statements related to this or other topics.

Recall Complaint

If you are experiencing issues with a recall remedy or believe a company is being non-responsive to your remedy request, please use this form and explain the situation to CPSC.

Applesauce products being recalled because of elevated lead levels

The following content is from the CT DPH on November 8, 2023 and was not written by HVHD. HARTFORD, Conn—Various applesauce products are being recalled across the country due to the risk of elevated blood lead levels. The items include WanaBana Apple Cinnamon Fruit Puree pouches, Schnucks brand Cinnamon-flavored Applesauce pouches, and Weis brand Cinnamon Applesauce pouches. The

Applesauce products being recalled because of elevated lead levels Read More »

The following content is from the CT DPH on November 8, 2023 and was not written by HVHD.

HARTFORD, Conn—Various applesauce products are being recalled across the country due to the risk of elevated blood lead levels. The items include WanaBana Apple Cinnamon Fruit Puree pouches, Schnucks brand Cinnamon-flavored Applesauce pouches, and Weis brand Cinnamon Applesauce pouches. The voluntary recall comes after four children in North Carolina who consumed one of the affected products showed signs of lead poisoning. The investigation by North Carolina health officials led to the discovery of extremely high lead concentrations in WanaBana Apple Cinnamon Fruit Puree. 

The United States Food and Drug Administration issued a public health alert regarding the WanaBana brand snacks, which are sold through national and online retailers including Sam’s Club, Amazon, and Dollar Tree. The recall has expanded to include the Schnucks and Weis brand apple puree pouches. The Schnucks items are sold at Schnucks and Eatwell Markets, while the Weis products can be found at Weis grocery stores. Eating the contaminated products could result in “acute toxicity,” FDA officials said. Parents and caregivers should not buy or serve the cinnamon applesauce products, which are sold through multiple retailers, including Amazon and Dollar Tree. 

“Consumers are advised to discard these items immediately and contact a healthcare provider if they or a family member consumed the tainted products or are showing symptoms,” said Connecticut Department of Public Health Commissioner Manisha Juthani, MD. “Symptoms from short-term exposure can include headaches, vomiting, and abdominal pain

“It is critical to check your home for these products, which could be harmful if consumed,” added Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection Commissioner Bryant T. Cafferelli.

If your child or children have eaten the cinnamon applesauce, DPH recommends discussing this with the child’s medical provider. DPH also notes that all children should be tested at least annually between 9 and 35 months to make sure the child is not being exposed to lead. 

Consumers with questions can contact WanaBana at support@wanabanafruits.com, or the Schnucks Customer Care team at 314-994-4400 or 1-800-264-4400, or the Weis Customer Service number at 866-999-9347.For more information on the childhood lead program at DPH, please visit the program’s website. Connecticut residents can also reach out to their local health department if they have questions on lead poisoning prevention.

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